Immigration policy: What lies ahead?

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Immigration policy: What lies ahead?

Photo courtesy of Mediaite.com

Photo courtesy of Mediaite.com

Photo courtesy of Mediaite.com

Photo courtesy of Mediaite.com

Lauren Price

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Boson Globe satirically warns America about the future of immigration if Trump elected

On Sunday, April 10, the Boston Globe ran an editorial warning of the implications of a Trump presidency, highlighting his proposed actions on immigration. The blaring headline read “Deportations To Begin” and underneath suggested that Trump was tripling down on ICE enforcement. Reactions to the satirical article encompass mixed emotions including praise and disappointment. Many journalistic publications say the article fell flat. Kathleen Kingsbury, the managing editor for the Boston Globe’s editorial page, told NPR that this is like nothing they have ever done before, but the possible outcomes of a Donald Trump presidency seem too dangerous not to take a stance on.

Despite U.S. law, immigrant children still being blocked from enrolling in school

According to a report done by Georgetown University Law Center researchers across four states, immigrant children are being blocked from enrolling in school, despite a U.S. law that requires all children in the country, residents or not, attend school until grade eight or age 16. Some of these delays are a result of local districts’ interpretation their states laws on residency. The report focused on Texas, Florida, New York and North Carolina and researchers have since turned over their recommendations to the U.S. Department of Education.

Immigration case set to be heard in the U.S. Supreme Court

On April 18, the United States Supreme Court will hear a lawsuit challenging immigration policies made by Barack Obama that temporarily protect four million immigrant adults from being deported, as long as they have no history of serious crime. The House of Representatives will have exactly 15 minutes to argue their case. Texas and more than 24 other states have sued in attempts to halt the programs and argue that the Deferred Action for Parents of Americans program is an “executive overreach.”

 

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